Anchor windlass problems

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  • #6471
    Stella Scot
    Participant

    Hello everybody,
    we are having some problems with our original S-Lectric windlass 519.

    It seems that the windlass is getting power from the batteries – I can hear the contact “click” but it is not moving. I am considering it might be voltage drop – but even with the charger on, its the same result.

    the windlass hasnt beeb used for about two years – can an electric motor seize during that period…? And how can I get it going again?

    Any advice most welcome:-)

    Best regards
    Kenneth

    #13381
    Stella Scot
    Participant

    I have just tried to find a manual online…does anyone have one where the diagram is clear?

    #13391
    michael bennett
    Participant

    Hello Kenneth,

    It is certainly possible for a motor to seize, but would consider it unlikely and the last resort as a solution.

    It may possibly after 2 years need a turn over by hand but would suggest it is an electrical problem, mine has a solenoid, which is what I think you can hear clicking, and the contacts may be making but have a poor connectivity due to corrosion or dirt, would certainly start there, make sure the solenoid is making the connection it should do for the heavier amperage the windlass will use.
    A step by step investigation would be the way to go rather than assume the worst scenario of a seized motor.

    Hope tgis helps.

    Mike

    #13401
    Stella Scot
    Participant

    Hello Mike,

    Thanks very much, I think Solenoid was the english term I couldn’t remember yesterday when posting the question here:-)

    But is it correct to assume that the solenoid is

    working on the positive cable, and the other heavy cable going to the windlass is the negative on?

    I am thinking, would it be possible to test the

    motor by taking a positive cable direct to the windlass and thereby “bypassing” the solenoid?

    #13411
    michael bennett
    Participant

    Hello Kenneth,
    I have in the past shorted the solenoid connections together which gives a direct feed to the motor, which in a few seconds will tell me if the solenoid is dicky.

    I know this will be frowned on by many, and would not recommend it to the uninitiated!!! but a heavy screwdriver held firmly across the connections will initially cause some sparks until firm contact made when the motor should turn.

    With common sense it should prove the solenoid is suspect if it just clicks and nothing happens, be careful if you do decide to short them out, and do not do it for more than a few seconds.

    I have done it many times in the past, usually on motor vehicles, so please do not sue me if things dont work out! it is entirely your choice.

    Regards

    Mike

    #13421
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi Kenneth,

    I had a similar problem with my windless, what can happen over a period of time is the brushes do not make good contact with the armature of the motor, rotate the motor spindle by hand whilst tapping the body of the motor, then try car jump / starter cables directly to the motor connections make sure you do not touch the jump leads together to the body of the motor because they can weld themselves to it !!!! not a good outcome normally.
    hope this helps, i am not an expert in this field and this is only a personal experience, so i take no responsibility for the above.
    best regards Steve

    #13431
    Stella Scot
    Participant

    Hello mike and Steve, thanks for the advice;-). But instead of opening the solenoid, wouldnt i get a direct lead with eg a starter cable between the two poles on the solenoid?
    Can i get to the motor spindle without removing the whole windlass? Or maybe im not quite sure what a spindle translates into in danish;-)?

    #13441
    michael bennett
    Participant

    Hi Kenneth,

    You do not need to open the solenoid to bridge the two connections on top.

    You are doing manually what the solenoid does electrically, that is a coil is energised by 12v, which bridges the two connections which are much heavier and allows a heavier current to be drawn, that is all a solenoid does, using a heavy screwdriver across the external connections does exactly the same thing, but please be careful if you decide to do that for the reasons previously mentioned.

    Steve has given good advice re turning the motor spindle by hand so the brushes make a better contact with the armature having stood idle for a long time.

    If you are still uncertain, an auto electrition will sort it for you quickly.

    Regards

    Mike

    #13681
    John Tyler
    Participant

    Have you checked that both the breaker switches are switched on? On my Nic they are located below the chart table.
    The are heat-sensitive, if the windlass is over-loaded they cut off the electrical power, after which they need to be reset by switching them back on.
    Cheers
    John [Aquarius – Nic 100]

    #13751
    Stella Scot
    Participant

    Hi John,

    I think our setup is a Little different, having rewired the boat many years ago. It only has one big fuse under the chart table with a switch. But thanks for the advice:-) by the way, do you know if I can get to the Electric motor by removing the large metal plate on se front of the windlass? ( I think its the front…)

    Kind regards
    Kenneth

    #13801
    Caileag
    Participant

    Hi
    Good advice from all above. In 32 years we have had problems a couple of times with the brushes on the motor not making contact. We have never disturbed the plate prefering to keep that watertight but lift the winch to get to the motor. We have recently fitted heavier cables from the battery, had the original old motor rewound and fitted a new drive belt. The end result is an amazingly improved powerful winch, well worth the expense. So don’t give up

    Good Luck
    Christine

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